Case Study - A conflict of interest

| Author: Simon Henson [Member (F1809)] | Filed under: Case Studies
Case Study - A conflict of interest

Suspicion

We received a call from a large London based corporation who believed that one of their Directors was acting in direct conflict with his role but needed evidence as to whether this was the case. They suspected that the Director was potentially mentoring 2 former employees who had been made redundant. Whilst employed by the company they were directly line managed by the same Director. They appeared to have an inappropriately close relationship with the Director which had been noticed by a number of employees. The previous employees had incorporated a company in the same industry as our client. There was a worry that sensitive information such as stakeholder details could be divulged, and introductions made. The Director had direct access to this information and due to their inappropriate relationship with the former employees it was a genuine concern.

Plan of Action

We met with the client for a free, confidential consultation away from our London office due to the client’s high profile, to ascertain full information, agree an investigation plan, the intentions, the subject’s work schedule and a budget.

A week-long period of surveillance was agreed, where all work commitments, off site meetings and social events would be evidenced utilising a team of highly skilled surveillance operatives in an array of covert vehicles.

Professionalism & Training

Our surveillance operatives mainly come from a law enforcement and military background, working previously on counter terror operations where national security was at risk and investigating serious and organised crime syndicates. However, we also employ civilian surveillance operatives with a wealth of commercial experience. Since 2016, to meet operational demand, our company has developed its own surveillance training programme where we mould and develop civilians from varied backgrounds into seasoned operatives.
Our operatives can fit into any environment and remain covert. We use the phrase, “It’s acceptable to be seen but not noticed.”

Surveillance Operation

The surveillance commenced in Central London. Initially there was a lot of downtime waiting for the subject of the enquiry to leave the confines of his work address. During this time the multiple exits at the work premises were eagerly monitored whilst the rest of the team wait like coiled springs. This is probably the hardest period for any surveillance team, remaining alert and not gaining attention from 3rd parties or worse still, the Police.

The operation was a complete success and the team acted remarkably, remaining professional throughout, recording the subject’s meetings and gaining video evidence to back up the evidential log and final report.

Not only did we produce evidence of association between the subject and the former employees, but also the mentorship, introduction to key stakeholders, website development, representing the newly incorporated company at networking events, and an extra marital relationship with one of the former employees which was no doubt his motivation.

The Result

The Director was removed from the business after being found guilty of gross misconduct at an employment tribunal. His shares were purchased at a reduced value and a contract preventing contact with the company’s clients and stakeholders for 12 months was put in place.

Article submitted by Simon Henson – Full member – F1809
Contact: enquiries@titaninvestigations.co.uk
For further info see here: www.titaninvestigations.co.uk

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